February 2013

“Man in a Cretan Cloak: JDS Pendlebury at Amarna” Rosalind Janssen (EEG Meeting Talk)

Sunday’s talk at the Essex Egyptology Group meeting was given by Rosalind Janssen and she told us about the life and death of John Devitt Stringfellow Pendlebury. He was an archaeologist in the 1930s who worked in Crete and in Egypt (at Amarna, the site of Akhenaten’s new city). When WWII broke out he joined the British Intelligence Service, and was killed in Crete during the war at the age of 36. There wasn’t much egyptology in this talk, it was all about Pendlebury the person and the legend. He was a larger than life character whose heroic death during the war added extra glamour to his persona. And you could say he’s the Marmite of egyptological personalities – Janssen mentioned a few times that he’s a hero of hers, but also pointed out that there are other people who regard him as overly flamboyant and romantic in his approach… Read More »“Man in a Cretan Cloak: JDS Pendlebury at Amarna” Rosalind Janssen (EEG Meeting Talk)

Photos from the Louvre

Back in September 2011 J & I spent a few days in Paris, primarily to go and look at the Egyptian collections in the Louvre. I’ve been very slack about sorting my photos out, but have finally put up the set from the second day we spent in the Louvre – they are all here and I’ve pulled out a few highlights for this post. We started off that day by looking at the Mona Lisa and some of the other Renaissance paintings, and the Winged Victory of Samothrace. After that we headed back to the second floor of the Egyptian galleries. This suite of rooms is laid out chronologically from the Pre-Dynastic period through to the Roman period. Each room had some key pieces laid out with lots of space round them and then a couple of cases tucked away at the side crammed with objects (like a selection… Read More »Photos from the Louvre