August 2015

Egypt Holiday 2014: Valley of the Queens

The top billed trip out of the whole of our Egypt holiday’s itinerary was the visit to Nefertari’s tomb in the Valley of the Queens. As with Seti I’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings (post) this tomb is not generally open to the public. Although clearly they do open it often enough to make it worth their while designing and printing tickets for it! I don’t think I’ve mentioned the tickets for sites in Egypt in my blog posts yet – they’re generally rather well done and souvenirs in their own right, and the Nefertari tomb one was no exception. Originally we weren’t visiting any of the other tombs in the Valley, but at the last minute Medhat changed some things around on the itinerary so that we could. Which was cool, because I’d not had the chance to see them before. As with the Valley of the… Read More »Egypt Holiday 2014: Valley of the Queens

Egypt Holiday 2014: Mortuary Temple of Seti I

Mortuary Temple of Seti I Seti I’s Mortuary Temple (called The Domain of Amen in the West of Thebes by the Egyptians) was the second of the 19th and 20th Dynasty mortuary temples that we visited – and seeing all three so close together (one a day) brought home the similarities in design that I otherwise wouldn’t’ve noticed. My photos from this site are up on flickr, click here for the full set or on any picture (except the temple plan) for that photo’s page on flickr. Partial Plan of Mortuary Temple of Seti I (from Wikimedia, uploaded by Zanaq). The plan above was the best (public domain) plan I could find for the temple – but it’s only a partial plan. North is to the top right corner of the image. To the south east (bottom of the image) the plan is truncated at the Second Pylon, the remains… Read More »Egypt Holiday 2014: Mortuary Temple of Seti I

Egypt Holiday: Colossi of Memnon

Colossi of Memnon The Colossi of Memnon are, for me, the most underwhelming site we visited in Egypt. The only bits you get a proper look at on the site are the two statues in a rather sad state, but admittedly huge. The first time we visited there in 2009 the rest of the site didn’t impinge on my consciousness at all, and this time it was only visible in tantalising glimpses of other reconstructed colossal statues. My photos from this site are on flickr here. View between the Colossi to the rest of the site This was once the vast mortuary temple of Amenhotep III, built mostly of mudbrick and within the area flooded by the annual inundation. Once his cult was abandoned and repair works ended the temple dissolved, and what stone there had been in the walls was taken by later Pharaohs to use in their own… Read More »Egypt Holiday: Colossi of Memnon

“The Slaughter Court in Sety I Temple, Abydos” Mohammed Abu el-Yezid (EEG Meeting Talk)

On Sunday Mohammed Abu el-Yezid, from the Ministry of Antiquties in Egypt, came to the Essex Egyptology Group to talk to us about the Slaughter Court in Seti I’s temple at Abydos. He is the Egyptologist and site manager for the province of Sohag (which includes Abydos) and he researched the Slaughter Court for his MA from Ain Shams University where he is currently studying for his PhD. An important part of the rituals in an Egyptian temple was the feeding of the god(s) the temple was dedicated to – with meat, as well as other foodstuffs. A temple was a place of purity, common people weren’t allowed in at all and only the High Priest or the King were permitted in the innermost sanctuary where the statue of the god lived. The priest had to purify himself before entering, performing the appropriate rituals around opening the doors and so… Read More »“The Slaughter Court in Sety I Temple, Abydos” Mohammed Abu el-Yezid (EEG Meeting Talk)

Egypt Holiday 2014: Walk from the Valley of the Kings to Deir el Medina

Walking over the Mountain After visiting the Valley of the Kings (post) we walked over the mountain to Deir el Medina. I didn’t take my camera with me as I (rightly) thought it would make the walk more difficult if I had to manage to keep the camera safe as well. J took his camera tho, and the pictures in this post and on flickr are his. View of the Valley of the Kings (left), Buildings at top of Valley (right) This walk would be how the workers who dug and decorated the tombs in the Valley got to and from work. There’s some disagreement as to whether they commuted every day or whether they overnighted at the “security post” buildings at the top of the Valley. While we were there Dylan said he didn’t think they slept there, but later on when we visited Deir el Medina Medhat said… Read More »Egypt Holiday 2014: Walk from the Valley of the Kings to Deir el Medina